schedule

As of 12.23.16, the schedule for Spring 2017 is as follows.

Week 1: January 11

Introduction to Technology & Poverty

Students will get an introduction to the course and the concepts we will cover in the semester.

No readings.

Week 2: January 18

Understanding Development

Students will learn about the history of the development discourse, starting from Truman’s speech right until the present day.

Readings:

Week 3: January 25

Understanding Poverty

Students will learn about poverty not just as it is measured but also as it is experienced.

Readings:

  • Banerjee, A. & Duflo, E. (2011). Think again, again in Poor economics: A radical rethinking of the way to fight global poverty. PublicAffairs. Browse the book’s website http://pooreconomics.com
  • Gates, B. (2013). GDP is a terrible way to measure a country’s economy and it hinders our ability to help the poor. In Slate: http://www.slate.com/articles/business/project_syndicate/2013/05/bill_gates_on_helping_the_poor_gdp_is_a_terrible_measurement.single.html
  • Easterly, W. (2002) Aid for Investment in The Elusive Quest for Growth: Economists’ Adventures and Misadventures in the Tropics.
  • Prahalad, C. K. (2006). The Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid. Pearson Education India.
  • Deepa, N., Patel, R., Schafft, K., Rademacher, A., & Koch-Schulte, S. (2000). Voices of the poor: Can anyone hear us? World Bank, Washington DC.
  • McIntyre, L., & Munro, J. (2013). “Nobody helps us”: insights from ultra-poor Bangladeshi women on being beyond reach. Development in Practice, 23(2), 157-168.

Week 4: February 1

Understanding Technology

Students will engage with different approaches to understanding technology and how it shapes (or not) social realities.

Readings:

  • Winner, L. (1980). Do artifacts have politics? Daedalus, 121-136.
  • Bijker, W. E. (1997). Of bicycles, bakelites, and bulbs: Toward a theory of sociotechnical change. MIT press.
  • Schumacher, E. F. (2011). Small is beautiful: A study of economics as if people mattered. Random House.
  • Marx, L. (1997). Technology: The Emergence of a Hazardous Concept. Social Research, 965-988.
  • Brewer, E., Demmer, M., Ho, M., Honicky, R. J., Pal, J., Plauche, M., & Surana, S. (2006). The challenges of technology research for developing regions. IEEE Pervasive Computing, 5(2), 15-23.
  • “Can Technology End Poverty” in Boston Review, November-December 2010. http://www.bostonreview.net/BR35.6/ndf_technology.php

Cases:

  • Parayil, G. (1992). The Green Revolution in India: A Case Study of Technological Change. Technology and Culture, 737–756.
  • Shiva, V. (1991). The violence of the green revolution. Third World Agriculture, Ecology and Politics. Londres & Nueva York: Zed Books Ltd, 20.
  • Fisher, M. (2006). Income is development: Kickstart’s pumps help Kenyan farmers transition to a cash economy. innovations, 1(1), 9-30.
  • Arp, H.P. and Baumgärtel, K. (2005). Case Study: The Consequences of the Akosombo Dam. Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich.

Week 5: February 8

Designing for Development

There have been various approaches targeting development with technology big and small. We will talk about some of these, carrying over from the previous lecture. 

Readings:

  • Smillie, I. (2000). Chapter 3: The Best of the West: Thinking Big. In Mastering the Machine Revisited: Poverty, Aid and Technology, 35-48. Verlag.
  • Mitchell, T. (1991). America’s Egypt: Discourse in the Development Industry. Middle East Report, 169, 18-36.
  • Burrell, J., & Toyama, K. (2009). What constitutes good ICTD research?. Information Technologies & International Development, 5(3), pp-82.
  • Ho, M. R., Smyth, T. N., Kam, M., & Dearden, A. (2009). Human-computer interaction for development: The past, present, and future. Information Technologies & International Development, 5(4), pp-1.
  • Toyama, K. (2015). Geek heresy: Rescuing social change from the cult of technology. PublicAffairs.

Cases:

  • Bilger, B. (2009). Hearth Surgery. The Quest for a Stove that Can Save the World. The New Yorker, December 21.

Week 6: February 15

Doing Design

We will go through the design thinking process in class, taking the full 3 hours on a design exercise and in teams.

No readings.

Week 7: February 22

Access + Postcolonial Computing

What does ‘access’ mean? The first step to introducing technology to underserved populations entails either granting them access or their exercising their agency to gain access. We will look at this phenomenon using the lens of postcolonial computing.

Readings:

  • Irani, L., Vertesi, J., Dourish, P., Philip, K., & Grinter, R. E. (2010, April). Postcolonial computing: a lens on design and development. In Proceedings of the SIGCHI conference on human factors in computing systems (pp. 1311-1320). ACM.
  • Smith, L. T. (1999). Decolonizing methodologies: Research and indigenous peoples. Zed books.
  • Burrell, J. (2010). Evaluating Shared Access: social equality and the circulation of mobile phones in rural Uganda. Journal of Computer‐Mediated Communication, 15(2), pp230-250.
  • Heimerl, K., Hasan, S., Ali, K., Brewer, E., & Parikh, T. (2013, December). Local, sustainable, small-scale cellular networks. In Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Information and Communication Technologies and Development: Full Papers-Volume 1 (pp. 2-12). ACM.
  • Sambasivan, N., Cutrell, E., Toyama, K., & Nardi, B. (2010). Intermediated technology use in developing communities. In Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (pp. 2583-2592). ACM.
  • Dourish, P., & Mainwaring, S. D. (2012). Ubicomp’s colonial impulse. In Proceedings of the 2012 ACM Conference on Ubiquitous Computing (pp. 133-142). ACM.

Week 9: March 8

Agriculture + Action Research

Agriculture and markets have been the focus of much ICTD research. We will look at some of this history at the same time as looking at the lens of action research and what that means for ICTD work.

Readings:

  • Olson, J. S., & Kellogg, W. A. (2014). Chapter 3: Knowing by Doing: Action Research as an Approach to HCI. Ways of Knowing in HCI. Springer, New York.
  • Jensen, R. (2007). The digital provide: Information (technology), market performance, and welfare in the South Indian fisheries sector. The quarterly journal of economics, 879-924.
  • Srinivasan, J., & Burrell, J. (2013, December). Revisiting the fishers of Kerala, India. In Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Information and Communication Technologies and Development: Full Papers-Volume 1 (pp. 56-66). ACM.
  • Anokwa, Y., Smyth, T. N., Ramachandran, D., Sherwani, J., Schwartzman, Y., Luk, R., … & DeRenzi, B. (2009). Stories from the field: Reflections on HCI4D experiences. Information Technologies & International Development, 5(4), pp-101.
  • Gandhi, R., Veeraraghavan, R., Toyama, K., & Ramprasad, V. (2007, December). Digital green: Participatory video for agricultural extension. In Information and Communication Technologies and Development, 2007. ICTD 2007. International Conference on (pp. 1-10). IEEE.
  • Patel, N., Chittamuru, D., Jain, A., Dave, P., & Parikh, T. S. (2010, April). Avaaj otalo: a field study of an interactive voice forum for small farmers in rural india. In Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (pp. 733-742). ACM.

Week 10: March 15

Entertainment + Ludic Design

Development is not only about means of improving livelihood in measurable terms such as food, health, education, etc. It is also about matters of leisure, some contend.

Readings:

  • Bailur, S. (2007, May). The complexities of community participation in ICT for development projects: The case of “Our Voices.”. In Proceedings of 9th International Conference on Social Implications of Computers in Developing Countries.
  • Chirumamilla, P., & Pal, J. (2013, December). Play and power: a ludic design proposal for ICTD. In Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Information and Communication Technologies and Development: Full Papers-Volume 1 (pp. 25-33). ACM.
  • Arora, P. & Rangaswamy, N. (2013). Digital leisure for development: reframing new media practice in the global South. Media, Culture & Society, 35(7), pp. 898-905.
  • Kumar, N. (2014). Facebook for self-empowerment? A study of Facebook adoption in urban India. New Media & Society.
  • Smyth, T. N., Kumar, S., Medhi, I., & Toyama, K. (2010, April). Where there’s a will there’s a way: mobile media sharing in urban india. In Proceedings of the SIGCHI conference on Human Factors in computing systems (pp. 753-762). ACM.
  • Vashistha, A., Cutrell, E., Borriello, G., & Thies, W. (2015, April). Sangeet swara: A community-moderated voice forum in rural india. In Proceedings of the 33rd Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (pp. 417-426).
  • Liang, L. (2010). “Access Beyond Developmentalism: Technology and the Intellectual Life of the Poor.” Information Technology and International Development Vol. 6.

Week 11: March 29

Health + A Feminist Standpoint

Global health research forms a major focus of global development work. We will look at just a few of these areas. Also, we will look at what we might learn from using a feminist standpoint, in this and other domains.

Readings:

  • Bardzell, S., & Bardzell, J. (2011, May). Towards a feminist HCI methodology: social science, feminism, and HCI. In Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (pp. 675-684). ACM.
  • Buskens, I. (2015). in Bidwell, N., & Winschiers-Theophilus, H. (Eds.). At the Intersection of Indigenous and Traditional Knowledge and Technology Design. Informing Science.
  • Haraway, D. (1988). Situated knowledges: The science question in feminism and the privilege of partial perspective. Feminist studies, 14(3), 575-599.
  • Natarajan, M., & Parikh, T. (2013, December). Understanding barriers to information access and disclosure for HIV+ women. In Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Information and Communication Technologies and Development: Full Papers-Volume 1 (pp. 143-152). ACM.
  • Karusala, N. & Kumar, N. (2017). Examining Women’s Safety in Public Spaces of New Delhi. In Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’17). ACM, New York, NY, USA. To appear.
  • Sterling, S. R., Dodson, L., & Al-Rabaan, H. (2014). The fog phone: water, women, and HCID. interactions, 21(6), 42-45.

Week 12: April 5

Education + Ethics of Care

Many resources are constrained in ‘developing’ regions, but research also finds that ‘care’ is oft a rich resource. We will discuss what this means, by focusing particularly on education projects.

Readings:

  • Toombs, A., Gross, S., Bardzell, S., & Bardzell, J. (2016). From Empathy to Care: A Feminist Care Ethics Perspective on Long-Term Researcher–Participant Relations. Interacting with Computers.
  • Noddings, N. (2013). An ethic of caring. Ethical theory: An anthology, 699-710.
  • Cervantes, R., Warschauer, M., Nardi, B., & Sambasivan, N. (2011, May). Infrastructures for low-cost laptop use in Mexican schools. In Proceedings of the SIGCHI conference on human factors in computing systems (pp. 945-954). ACM.
  • Warschauer, M., & Ames, M. (2010). Can One Laptop per Child save the world’s poor? Journal of international affairs, 33-51.
  • Kam, M., Kumar, A., Jain, S., Mathur, A., & Canny, J. (2009, April). Improving literacy in rural India: Cellphone games in an after-school program. In Information and Communication Technologies and Development (ICTD), 2009 International Conference on (pp. 139-149). IEEE.
  • Yang, Y., Hu, X., Qu, Q., Lai, F., Shi, Y., Boswell, M., & Rozelle, S. (2013). Roots of tomorrow’s digital divide: Documenting computer use and internet access in china’s elementary schools today. China & World Economy, 21(3), 61-79.

Week 13: April 12

Impact + Sustainability

We will look at what ICTD projects mean in the long term and what we might keep in mind when we think about ‘impact’. Time, temporality, sustainability, etc. is what we will talk about, also discussing what these terms mean in the context of global development projects.

Readings:

  • Mudliar, P., Donner, J., & Thies, W. (2012). Emergent practices around CGNet Swara, voice forum for citizen journalism in rural India. In Proceedings of the Fifth International Conference on Information and Communication Technologies and Development (pp. 159-168). ACM.
  • Marathe, M., O’Neill, J., Pain, P., & Thies, W. (2015). Revisiting CGNet Swara and its impact in rural India. In Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Information and Communication Technologies and Development (p. 21). ACM.
  • Dell, N., & Kumar, N. (2016, May). The Ins and Outs of HCI for Development. In Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (pp. 2220-2232). ACM.
  • Kumar, N., Perrier, T., Desmond, M., Israel-Ballard, K., Kumar, V., Mahapatra, S., … & Anderson, R. (2015, May). Projecting health: Community-led video education for maternal health. In Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Information and Communication Technologies and Development (p. 17). ACM.
  • Kumar, N., & Anderson, R. J. (2015, April). Mobile phones for maternal health in rural India. In Proceedings of the 33rd Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (pp. 427-436). ACM.
  • Taylor, N., Cheverst, K., Wright, P., & Olivier, P. (2013, April). Leaving the wild: lessons from community technology handovers. In Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (pp. 1549-1558). ACM.

Week 14: April 19

Jeopardy!

Student teams will present their final projects in the first half of the class. In the second half, we will do a course review in Jeopardy format. There will be prizes and opportunities to win extra credit.

No readings.

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